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Feedback Literacy in Three Measures: A Rubric for the Feedback Literate Classroom

Starting this fall, my 7th, 8th, and 10th grade English students will use the following rubric to help guide their interactions with feedback. The descriptions on this rubric stem from both our Floop-teachers’ experiences in the classroom and also UK-based feedback expert, Dr. Naomi Winstone’s research findings.

What excites me about this rubric is that the complex task of the feedback process has been simplified into three distinct moments for discussion and reflection. They are: seeking feedback, making sense of feedback, and using feedback to learn.

My plan is to assess just one assignment according to this rubric at the beginning, middle, and end of the year. For other assignments, students will self-assess and share their findings. The rubric can be our starting point for class discussions on feedback and 1:1 conferences.

Note the importance of having clear work-in-progress assignments so students can show evidence of feedback literacy in this way.

My work-in-progress assignments will look like this:
  1. Seeking Feedback - 1st Draft (s) + feedback collections (due _)
  2. Understanding Feedback - Revision planning questionnaire completed (due _)
  3. Using Feedback to Learn - Final draft + reflection questionnaire completed (due _)

Rubric for Feedback Literacy




In upcoming posts, I'll share samples of student feedback collections as well as revision planning and reflection questionnaires.

As always, the Floop team is looking for ways to iterate on feedback literacy practices. If you try this rubric in your own classroom, let us know how it goes!

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For feedback information to be useful, it must communicate:  Where am I going? (What are the goals?)How am I going? (What progress is being made toward the goal?)Where to next? (What activities need to be undertaken to make better progress?) (Hattie & Timperley, 2007).  Supporting students in engaging with the grading criteria helps give context to the feedback to come. In other words, it does the groundwork of helping them determine for themselves, "Where am I going?"


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This series of posts will cover a variety of bite-sized strategies that can be incorporated into a more holistic feedback system. To learn more about the research behind these approaches, we recommend you first read our white paper.

Most of us have experienced that moment where you pass back papers, full of rich and detailed feedback, and watch a student walk out of class and drop it in the recycling. It's hard not to take it personally. Why do some of our students struggle so much with receiving and using feedback?